Boxing Tips: How To Wrap Your Hands The Right Way

Hand injuries side line more boxers than any other injury. Because there are so many small bones in your hand, it is absolutely imperative that you take every precaution available to protect them. Proper hand wrapping is the best method of preventing an injury that could keep you out of this great sport. We recognize the importance of protecting your hands and have provided the following instructions to teach you the proper method.

Please keep in mind that this is a general guide and other methods do exist. We feel that the method below is a good starting point and covers all the basic points of proper hand protection.

 Step 1

Your hand should be held open in a relaxed position, with your fingers spread apart. Begin by placing the hand wrap thumb loop around your thumb and be sure that the ‘This Side Down’ text on the hand wrap is against your skin. Bring the wrap across the back of your hand and wrap around your wrist 2 or 3 times.Be sure to wrap high enough (2″ to 3″ up from your wrist joint) on the wrist to maximize support. You want to keep the hand wrap snug throughout this process, but not so tight that it will cut off your circulation.

Step 2

From the wrist, bring the wrap across the back of your hand and around your palm, then across the top of your knuckles.

Step 3

Wrap around the knuckle area 2 to 3 times. From the top of your knuckles, wrap across the back of your hand toward your wrist and around. This will create an ‘x’ pattern across the back of the hand.Repeat the ‘x’ pattern 2 or 3 times.

Step 4

Continue around the palm of your hand to the base of your thumb. Wrap completely around your thumb and back toward your wrist on the palm side of your hand.It is important to keep the wrap from twisting while wrapping the thumb.

Step 5

Continue wrapping around the back of your hand to the thumb and once again wrap around your thumb, this time from the opposite direction.

Step 6

Wrap from the thumb over the back of your hand and around your wrist.

Step 7

Continue around your wrist, over the back of your hand and through the space between your pinky and ring fingers. Wrap around your palm back toward your wrist and repeat the steps for each finger.Be sure to keep the wrap as flat as possible and twist free.

Step 8

With the last finger completed, bring the wrap across the palm back toward your wrist.

Step 9

Continue wrapping across the back of your hand toward your knuckles.

Step 10

Wrap once more around the top of the knuckles and across the back of your hand toward your wrist.

Step 11

Secure your wrist with the remaining hand wrap. Be sure to wrap it snugly to provide support for your wrist.

Step 12

Fasten the Hook & Loop closure and you’re done.

Step 13

The finished product should be a secure and protected tightly wrapped hand.

Boxing is Beautiful

I think boxing is beautiful.  For the general population, however, this may be the polar opposite of what they envision the sport to be.  As a matter of fact, there are most certainly people who feel boxing is too brutal, too barbaric, too violent even to be considered a sport, much less beautiful.   Honestly, I can understand their point of view.  On the surface, and from a casual spectator’s perspective, they simply see two guys unnecessarily putting themselves in harm’s way, fighting in an attempt to incapacitate one another.  If you’re one of these people, I hope that by the time you’re finished reading this, you’re able to look at boxing differently and appreciate it for what it truly is – simply beautiful.

Let’s start with the basics, the mental and emotional fortitude necessary to train and

Roadwork

compete.  We can all relate with the concept of general physical fitness and what that, even at its most basic level, requires of us.  It requires dedication.  It requires focus.  It requires discipline. It requires sacrifice.  Now multiply that by one-thousand, and you will begin to get a sense of the level of commitment necessary to become successful in boxing.  Many of us can only imagine the mental and emotional strength needed to first of all generate these attributes, and then maintain them for what amounts to years upon years.

So far we’ve discussed only a few of the mental and emotional elements required of the

De La Hoya/Trinidad

sport, but there’s more.  The ability to step into the ring and face your opponent one-on-one requires an element of courage and self-control unique in the world of sport.  There is an element of danger and risk involved that can’t be duplicated.  Mind, body and soul must be more focused and in-the-moment than at any other time.  Being able to harness and control the title wave of emotions, including anxiety, excitement, anger and fear, is a task most are not up to but which a boxer does every time he steps into the ring.

Let’s move on to the physical demands of the sport.  No other activity taxes the body more comprehensibly.  Jogging, weight lifting, sparring, jumping rope and countless rounds on the bags and mitts are a part of what boxers must fight through.  A significant portion of this preparation is repetitive, where the same movement is made (the delivery of a jab, for example) for weeks and even months until the movement is second nature, until it can be made without having to think about it, until it becomes instinct.

Boxing routinely pushes the body to its limits during training, thereby continuously raising the bar and providing the athlete with an ever-raising benchmark.  When every fiber of the boxer’s being wants to quit, it’s then that he pushes through and battles to the finish.

The apex of all the mental and physical training is competition.  It’s a celebration of the work already accomplished, a fight in-and-of-itself.  Although most never actually witness the preparation first-hand, it’s clearly evident as soon as the first punch is thrown and the dance begins.

There’s subtle, almost unnoticeable movements used to gain the advantage.  There’s the

Amateur Competition

instinctual reactions so deep ingrained in the boxer that they require no thought.  There’s an intrinsic understanding of the science that provides glimpses into the future, allowing boxers to react to maneuvers that have yet to be made.  There are adjustments to technique that make it as much about strategy as strength.  There is masking of injury, as to not show weakness.  It’s a war of will, strength and heart, unique to the sport of boxing.

To me, boxing is art, like an elegant ballet or finely-tuned orchestra.  It encompasses countless positive attributes, many of which can’t be seen, only felt and experienced.  It discriminates against no one, equally applicable from the 12-year old amateur to the hall-of-fame world champion.  That’s what makes boxing great.  That’s what makes boxing beautiful.

———————————————-   Holiday 2012   ———————————————-

Experience the beauty of boxing for yourself and save big this holiday season.  Ringside’s holiday store is now open, and with gifts for everyone on your list, there is only one place to go – ringside.com, “The Best in Boxing”.

2012 Ringside World Championships Training Camp- Week 9

There’s less than two weeks before the first bell rings at the 2012 Ringside World Championships.  On August 1st, competition in the largest amateur boxing tournament in the world will get underway and with it, the celebration of all your hard work, determination and sacrifice.

You’ve been in camp for two months, and the prize is within sight.  The key now, in the

2012 Ringside World Championships

days leading-up to the big show, is fine-tuning and rest.  The objective of this part of camp is to maintain your conditioning and recover from the taxing workouts that constituted previous weeks of training.

Although a specific training regimen should be tailored to the individual athlete, there are several general items that should be incorporated into Week 9 of your training camp.

Diet

Eat smart.  Eat Healthy.  You’re going to need all the energy you can muster for the upcoming competition, so don’t get off track now.  Continue to fuel your body properly.  At this point, you should be on or very near your competition weight.  This will give your body plenty of time to acclimate, and you won’t have to worry about making weight at the event.  This will allow you to concentrate on your opponent, not the scale.

Roadwork 

Continue your routine by jogging four miles, five to six days per week, at a nice, steady pace.  Feel free to throw in a few sprints here and there, but not as hard or consistently as you were in previous weeks.  Remember, the goal of this part of camp is to maintain and recover.

Gym Workout

Just like you did at the beginning of camp, insure that your fundamentals are solid in these weeks leading-up to the tournament.  Continue to work your obligatory four rounds at each station (heavy bag, shadow boxing, jump rope, mitts, etc.) at a consistent pace.  Incorporate your final two to three sessions of sparring into these remaining weeks to insure that your timing, distance and reflexes all primed for competition.

The difficult part of camp is over.  You’ve done it, but training isn’t over just yet.  Take this time to insure your fundamentals are solid, your technique is on point and your mindset is positive.  Maintain and recover.

If you missed Week 1, Week 3, Week 5 or Week 7 of training camp, click here.

 

-Never.Stop.Training.-

2012 Ringside World Championships Training Camp – Week 7

T minus three weeks and counting until the first punch is thrown at the 2012 Ringside

2012 Ringside World Championships

World Championships in Kansas City.  Your victory is earned in the weeks and months leading up to the event.  It’s what you do NOW that insures a great performance then.

The tournament itself is the culmination of all the effort you’ve invested, all the hours in the gym, all the punches thrown, all the miles logged on the track.  It is where you showcase the skill you’ve developed and the conditioning you’ve built.  It’s a time for celebration.

To get there, it’s important that you stay focused and dedicated during the final weeks of camp.  During these next two weeks, specifically, we will make an all-out, final push in our preparations.

Although a specific training regimen should be tailored to the individual athlete, there are several general items that should be incorporated into Week 7 of your training camp.

Diet

Continue to fuel your body with a healthy diet, the benefits of which are numerous.  It will give you the power to fight through these remaining weeks of camp, which means you’ll be in better shape for competition and more energized during the bouts.  It will also help you reach and/or maintain your competition weight more efficiently.  This can’t be stressed enough – don’t wait until the last minute to cut weight!  Preferably, you should be at your competition weight a week before the tournament.

Roadwork

At this point, you should be consistently running at least four miles, five to six days per week.  Your pace should be brisk and challenging.  Continue incorporating sprints or intervals into your routine.  During your bout there will be times of high and low output, relatively speaking, so your roadwork should mimic this pattern.

As an option, you can try alternating between distance and interval runs.  One day, run for your obligatory four miles, and the next day, perform an interval routine where you focus on giving spurts of 100% output.

Gym Workout

Your gym workouts should be intense and taxing.  Give it all you got, and leave it all in the

Robert "The Ghost" Guerrero

gym.  Work at least four, three-minute rounds at each station (shadow boxing, mitts, speed bag, heavy bag, etc.).  While you’re training, picture yourself in the ring, at the tournament, with your opponent in front of you.  Imagine various situations and your reactions to them.  Having rehearsed the scenarios in your head, during training, you will be better prepared when the time comes to perform.

You should be consistently sparring two times per week for three to four, three minute rounds.  You can even incorporate a mock-bout by staging an actual competition match in your gym.  Have your coach wrap your hands with gauze and tape, just like he will at the tournament.  Wear your uniform, have your coach be the referee and sit between rounds.  The objective of this exercise is to get better accustomed to the atmosphere of an actual competitive match.

If you missed the tips from Week 1, Week 3 or Week 5, click here.

-Never.Stop.Training-

2012 Ringside World Championships Training Camp – Week 5

You’ve committed an entire month of training to the 2012 Ringside World

2012 Ringside World Championships

Championships,and there’s no turning back now.  With the big dance only five weeks away, you’re about half way through camp, and it’s time to raise the bar even further.

By now, you should be in a set routine that incorporates a healthy diet, training and rest.  Establishing the regimen was the hard part.  With momentum now on your side, you’re on a path that leads directly to Kansas City and an outstanding performance.

You’ve put in the work and laid a strong foundation.  It’s now time to build on that and push your body even further.  Stepping into the boxing ring to compete can be one of the most strenuous, nerve-racking and physically taxing experiences anyone can go through (and consequently, one of the most rewarding).  It’s essential that you’re as prepared as possible when the time comes, so push your mind and body now to insure you’re ready.

Although a specific training regimen should be tailored to the individual athlete, there are several general items that should be incorporated into Week 5 of your training camp:

Diet

Continue your healthy diet.  Avoid the temptations of junk food and fuel your body with nothing but the best.  It will show in your workouts and ultimately, in your performance.  We’re about half way through training camp, so if you’re trimming down for the tournament, you should be half way to your competition weight.  Don’t wait until the last minute to lose weight!  It will damper the experience and negatively affect your performance.

Roadwork

You should be consistently logging 3 – 4 miles, at least five days per week and at a healthy pace.  It’s now time to incorporate sprints.

Boxing matches aren’t static.  There is an ebb and flow to them, times of heated activity, as in the middle of an exchange, and times of lesser action, as you search for an opening.  The roadwork you perform should mirror the output required in the ring.  There is a wide variety of sprint routine options, so you should integrate the one that works best for you.  However, a good place to start would be to incorporate 20 – 30 second sprints, every couple of minutes, as you take your daily jog.  With time, you’ll find that you will be able to invest a greater amount of energy during the bursts and recover faster.

Gym Workout

Your gym workouts should be all about intensity.  Perform four, three-minute rounds at each station (shadow boxing, heavy bag, double-end bag, mitts, etc.), and concentrate on the intensity of each round.  Push yourself.  Remember that your eventual opponent is training too, maybe at the exact same time you are.  It’s up to you to train harder, sacrifice greater and focus more intently than him.  It will be worth it in the end.

Sparring should also commence now.  One to two times per week for three, three-minute

Sparring should be a learning experience.

rounds will be sufficient.  Keep in mind that you shouldn’t be fighting for your life when you spar.  It should be a learning experience.  Enter the session knowing what you want to practice and heed your coach’s instructions.  Eventually, your skill, timing, reaction speed and distance will improve.  For more information on sparring, check out John Brown’s Principles of Proper Sparring DVD.

If you missed the tips from Week 1 or Week 3, click here.

-Never. Stop. Training-

2012 Ringside Masters World Championships

This weekend, March 30 - 31, Ringside will host the first ever Ringside Masters World

2012 Ringside Masters World Championships

Championships in Kansas City, MO.  The tournament is open to men and women athletes over the age of 34.  More than 80 Masters competitors registered for the amateur boxing tournament, the most senior, an outstanding 77 years of age.    

All possible precautions are being implemented to insure the safety of the athletes.  The boxers are being required to compete in 16 oz. sparring gloves and well-padded headgear. Each round will be 1 minute in length.

Although Masters competition takes place at the Ringside World Championships every August, opportunities for Masters boxers to compete are still scarce, so Ringside felt it appropriate to provide another stage for these passionate, hard working and dedicated competitors to shine. 

John Brown, Owner/CEO of Ringside, Inc. and tournament director, states, “You would be

John Brown at Masters Tournament Orientation Meeting

amazed at the competition these mature folks provide. They have an incredible passion for the sport. Some have experience and some have none. All opponents are matched within 10 years in age, 10 pounds in weight, and equal experience. It makes me proud to be a part of such a special event.”

Follow along for updates on Facebook.com/RingsideBoxing and on Twitter #RingsideMasters via @RingsideBoxing